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What is Lone Pairs in College Chemistry? PDF Download

Learn Lone Pairs definition in college chemistry with explanation to study “What is Lone Pairs”. Study lone pairs explanation with college chemistry terms to review chemistry course for online degree programs.

Lone Pairs Definition:

Lone Pairs Explanation:

In chemistry, a lone pair represents a pair of valence electrons that are not shared with another atom and is sometimes termed as an unshared pair or non-bonding pair. Lone pairs are present in the outermost electron shell of atoms. Their identification is possible by using a Lewis structure. Electron pairs are therefore named as lone pairs if two electrons are paired but are not used in chemical bonding .Examples are the transition metals. Lone pairs in ammonia (A), water (B), and hydrogen chloride (C). A single lone pair can be found with atoms in the nitrogen group e.g. nitrogen in ammonia, two lone pairs can be found with atoms in the halogen group e.g. oxygen in water and the halogens can carry three lone pairs e.g. in hydrogen chloride.

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