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What are Bulk feeders in Biology? PDF | Download eBooks

Learn Bulk feeders definition in biology with explanation to study “What are Bulk feeders”. Study bulk feeders explanation with biology terms to review biology course for online degree programs.

Bulk feeders Definition

  • Bulk feeders are those which eat relatively large pieces of food.

    Campbell Biology by J.B. Reece, L.A. Urry, M.L. Cain, S.A. Wasserman, P.V. Minorsky, R.B. Jackson



Bulk feeders Explanation

Most animals are bulk feeders. They eat relatively large pieces of food. Many vertebrates, including ourselves, are bulk feeders. Both carnivores and herbivores may use the same feeding mechanism. A lion chewing meat from a fresh kill is a bulk feeder, as is a hippopotamus dining on a tasty meal of water plants. The adaptations of bulk feeders include tentacles, pincers, claws, venomous fangs, jaws, and teeth that kill their prey or tear off pieces of meat or vegetation. In this amazing scene, a rock python is beginning to ingest a gazelle it has captured and killed. Snakes cannot chew their food into pieces and must swallow.

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