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Facultative anaerobes Definition and Explanation PDF | Download eBooks

Learn Facultative anaerobes definition in biology with explanation to study “What are Facultative anaerobes”. Study facultative anaerobes explanation with biology terms to review biology course for online degree programs.

Facultative anaerobes Definitions:

  1. Facultative anaerobes are those organisms including yeasts and many bacteria, can make enough ATP to survive using either fermentation or respiration.

    Campbell Biology by J.B. Reece, L.A. Urry, M.L. Cain, S.A. Wasserman, P.V. Minorsky, R.B. Jackson



  2. Facultative anaerobes use O2 if it is present but can also carry out fermentation or anaerobic respiration in an anaerobic environment.

    Campbell Biology by J.B. Reece, L.A. Urry, M.L. Cain, S.A. Wasserman, P.V. Minorsky, R.B. Jackson



Facultative anaerobes Explanation:

A facultative anaerobe is an organism that makes ATP by aerobic respiration if oxygen is present, but is capable of switching to fermentation or anaerobic respiration if oxygen is absent. An obligate aerobe, by contrast, cannot make ATP in the absence of oxygen, and obligate anaerobes die in the presence of oxygen. An example of facultative anaerobe is E coli.

Facultative anaerobes Explanation:

A facultative anaerobe is an organism that makes ATP by aerobic respiration if oxygen is present, but is capable of switching to fermentation if oxygen is absent. Some examples of facultatively anaerobic bacteria are Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp.

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