As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

What is Alloploidy in Biology? PDF | Download eBooks

Learn Alloploidy definition in biology with explanation to study “What is Alloploidy”. Study alloploidy explanation with biology terms to review biology course for online degree programs.

Alloploidy Definition

  • Various mechanisms can change a sterile hybrid into a fertile polyploid called an allopolyploid. allopolyploids are fertile when mating with each other but cannot interbreed with either parent species; thus, they represent a new biological species.

    Campbell Biology by J.B. Reece, L.A. Urry, M.L. Cain, S.A. Wasserman, P.V. Minorsky, R.B. Jackson



Alloploidy Explanation

The allopolyploid nucleus also has multiple copies of the genome. This happens when more than the required number of species contributes to the nucleus chromosomes. For example, we could consider the grain wheat. This wheat is a cross between three types of grasses. Since all the three types are contributing, they hold six set of chromosomes. Each set of chromosome has one homologous pair. This makes them perfect for a complete meiosis.

Keep Learning Biology Explanations

What is Protein phosphatase?

A phosphatase is an enzyme that removes a phosphate group from a protein which changes its function by either leaving ...

What is Transmembrane route?

The transmembrane route is a route where water and solutes use a combination of the apoplastic and symplastic modes of ...

What are Cytokines?

Cytokines are a broad and loose category of small proteins that are important in cell signaling. Cytokines are small peptide ...

What is Polarity?

Polarity is a fundamental property of biological systems. Polarity is defined as the persistent asymmetrical and ordered distribution of structures ...

What is Heterokaryon?

A heterokaryon is a multinucleate cell that contains genetically different nuclei. ...

What are Bulk feeders?

Most animals are bulk feeders. They eat relatively large pieces of food. Many vertebrates, including ourselves, are bulk feeders. Both ...