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What is Architectural Transcription Factor in Molecular Biology? PDF | Download eBooks

Learn Architectural Transcription Factor definition in molecular biology with explanation to study “What is Architectural Transcription Factor”. Study architectural transcription factor explanation with molecular biology terms to review molecular biology course for online degree programs.

Architectural Transcription Factor Definition

  • A protein that does not activate transcription by itself, but helps DNA bend so other activators can stimulate transcription..

    Molecular Biology by Robert F. Weaver



Architectural Transcription Factor Explanation

Architectural Transcription Factor is a protein that helps the DNA to bend, so that other activators can stimulate transcription. It does not activate transcription by itself. There has been considerable progress in the research to define the physical chemistry of complexes between remodeled DNA and the Architectural Transcription Factor.

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